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20121128
20121206
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
's right. joe lieberman is conservative, a hawk, respected by some senators on foreign policy issues. there may be three republican senators who don't like her, another 97 who have votes, the house members who have been campaigning against her don't have votes. something chip said, it would be weird or odd for this process to be playing out if she is not going to be nominated as secretary of state. chip, it shows i think a real political premise on your part, and i think unfortunately shared by so much of your party here, she's a cabinet-level foreign policy person. so if you're serious about any of these issues, it shouldn't matter whether she's nominated or not. you should care about the substance of it. secondly, you and your party come to this debate with big deficit because you and president bush and dick cheney lied this country into war and you had a lot of lies on foreign policy about wmds. president bush even said once in may 2003 that we found the wmds in iraq. dick cheney and condoleezza rice talked about links to al qaeda in iraq. you've never made up for those huge, seri
'll be talking foreign policy with national security adviser dr. brzezinski. keep it right here on "morning joe." music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to
foreign policy views. gwen: and he was close to chris stevens, the ambassador. >> i think there's a lot of personal feelings there. gwen: how much of it is about what the u.n. ambassador said on a talk show and how much of this is about what the intelligence department didn't do and what the state department didn't do? >> you're 100% right. i mean, i talked to republicans this week about this, and foreign policy expert republicans, who say why are we picking this fight? what we need to be asking is did the intelligence community decide to use the different language because they were playing politics, or did they not know? we've heard that general petraeus said that he immediately assumed that this was a terror attack from al qaeda. so the question is this republican said to me, why are we making this about her? this needs to be about something bigger that is actually bigger than susan rice. did we get it wrong? did we pay no attention to it because there was an election? i mean, those are very important issues that of course -- >> and didn't it feed those suspicions when after they had
the nature of the obama administration foreign policy is, paul. and susan rice in some ways encapsulates a strain in democratic policy thinking that goes way back, a story that's actually told by samantha power, a close aide to president obama and wrote about genocide in with a randa. and susan rice is state department that makes a cameo appearance in the book, quoted asking, if we call what happened in rwanda genocide, how does it play for us in what were then the mid term elections of 1994. well, there's a pattern here as we see. one is a reluctance to have america be engaged in certain issues, and the second one is politicizing foreign policy issues because they might hurt the president's political stance. >> paul: and you want a secretary of state, if you're-- well, the american people want a secretary of state who is some more independent judgment and not thinking so much about the politics, is that the point? >> that would be one thing that you would look for in the secretary of state. >> paul: sorry for stating the obvious. >> the national interests and not the president's mid ter
, the republican party for vice president and president nominated candidates who not only had zero foreign policy between them but no coherent policy whatsoever about what to do about the war and didn't mention it. while we have 66,000 americans in that war right now. we have serious things to make serious decisions about as a country. how do we turn down the nonsense enough to hope that our political process can be the means by which we make these grave and serious decisions? joining now is senator jeff merkley of oregon, chief sponsor of the amendment that passed calling on an accelerated withdrawal of u.s. forces from afghanistan. senator merkley, congratulations on the success of that amendment today. >> thank you very much, rachel. it's an incredible amount of things happening around the world today. >> yeah. i feel like this is one of those moments when i have very high hopes and very high wishes for what our political process will be capable of doing, and i have to say, seeing your amendment passed today in such a bipartisan fashion with so much republican support made me have some hope th
of state, they don't get into domestic politics. but when there's an extra nation on foreign policy to the american people, they do go on news shows. i used to go on news shows. susan rice has been on other news shows besides those five. they are the chief foreign policy spokesman for theed a handwriting. to suggest not to go on news shows because that's political is just not part of precedent and it's wrong. i think senator collins is -- i know her. i think she's trying to do the best job she can. but to say not to go on those news shows, that doesn't really jive. >> let me ask you one other thing, governor, about senator collins. she wants susan rice to explain her role in the bombings in africa, tanzania and kenya in 1998. you were the ambassador in 1998. did susan rice have any oversight or any authority at all that dealt with those embassies in kenya and tanzania that she would have to explain? >> no. she is not a homeland security officer. at the time, she was assistant secretary of africa on policy. she was making policy towards sudan, towards kenya, towards south africa. an
, the foreign policy team. >> we saw this joking moment, let me replay it, a news conference to push the u.n. treaty on disabilities which -- >> which is going to -- may fail. >> which is unbelievable since america has been -- >> very surprising. >> way out front since the days of bush '41 and tom harken was the big -- >> bob dole. >> and john mccain today made a plea for bob dole who is in walter reed he wants to see this great moment, a worldwide standard, it would be good for business, but as you pointed out on the daily rundown today, the chamber of commerce supports this, selling wheelchairs -- >> around the world. >> and here, it's stalemate. it needs two-thirds, more than 60. this is a treaty. because it has u.n. attached to it -- >> going to say it's brand, it's about brand. >> at that moment with mccain and john kerry because of foreign relations issue and this is the way mccain sort of gigged john kerry and kerry teased him back. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> thank you very much, mr. president. >> and there was a lot of joking after that. a lot of laughing. >> we shou
-- there was like -- there is a lack of talk i guess as far as obama's -- foreign policies also. so i just want to -- i want to see what you say about that, too. >> stephanie: i'm sorry. about his foreign policy? >> yeah. about his foreign policies. there's no real path that i see by that. where they -- where they're going with that, i guess. okay. that's a little doughy. he was spitballing a term paper. somehow the fiscal cliff got in the foreign policy. here is monday morning. it is all right. >> yeah, we just flush the lines with that one. >> stephanie: sure. a little telephone call and blow. >> yeah. >> is there something happening we should have a policy for that. >> said he was a college student so my guess is that if he's up this early he's probably still up from last night. >> stephanie: he's been up all night. things are a little doughy in there. that's okay. it is like jim -- >> give him 30 minutes. >> stephanie: last-minute ideas. curious your thoughts on -- >> stuff that happened -- [ ♪ "jeopardy
in the senate really has been his work in foreign relations, and in the area of foreign policy. i think the senate would be losing a giant in that record. i don't know how that directly impacts the state of massachusetts, but certainly it certainly is never good to lose a senator with that much seniority. >> what about senator patrick of massachusetts. what would happen here? he's got two years left in his term. he could run for senate if he left, i don't know if he'd have to step down, or he might even leave to go to a cabinet post. do you think scott brown might run for governor? >> i think he would be better advised to run for governor. now there's also talk and this being massachusetts where the democrats run everything and there are about 11 republicans left to complain, there's talk that they might 15 finagle the rules again that he's not old school democratic enough to do that. there was rumblings in the boston her and would that said that there was some talk on beacon hill that the democrats the legislature might go back to the old system that they changed so that mitt romney wo
in his foreign policy. >> ari, what's the talk in massachusetts about a possible senate race of john kerry because there's still speculation he might go to defense if he didn't go to state. >> theol
confidence in her and if he chooses to go with her, it will be continuity in his foreign policy. >> ari, what's the talk in massachusetts about a possible senate race of john kerry because there's still speculation he might go to defense if he didn't go to state. >> the folks i know who work for john kerry are much more focused on the fit for the state department because that is of course what he oversees on his committee.
on this, she will eventually be forced to relent. she does not have the experience on foreign policy. host: in this wall street journal era, it says the administration may have erred. there are different ways of treating the politics on doing that. you could argue that going in preemptively was a better course in some respects. the idea of a susan rice nomination is still something of a trial balloon, because the president has not said definitively that he wants to make her secretary of state. so this was sort of testing period to see if she could survive. at the same time, no one in the white house has denied that she is his favorite candidate. it could have gone on either way, frankly, yesterday, or at some point after he had already nominated her. host: newspapers are reporting susan rice will be meeting with susan collins of maine and senator bob corker of tennessee, who is in line to be the ranking republican on the senate foreign relations committee, which will hold confirmation hearings for secretary of state nominees. these three republicans would need more republicans to come to t
's exactly what ari was saying which is the president is asking who is most in sync with my foreign policy? ambassador rice is someone who helped form late the obama foreign policy. i think senator kerry would too. democrats are now in a position where we have an embarrassment of riches. i really hope they don't start worrying about this or that political matter. in democrats can't win elections in massachusetts, there's something fundamentally wrong with what we're doing. >> he did win the last time, scott brown. not this time but the time before he won in massachusetts. we got to leave it there. paul, ari, guys thank you. the search is now on the for the country's latest multimillionaire. in the next hour we'll have the latest on where the winning tickets in the power ballot ri were sold. and coming up next, accusations a u.s. ally is now helping iran cheat on international economic sanctions by helping sell its oil for gold. [ male announcer ] when this hotel added aflac to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yel
'll read an excerpt from foreign policy. with the exception of syria she's won every major battle she's fought at u.n., imposes sanctions on north korea, sending a peacekeeping force, and warding off a full-scale war of sudan and south sudan. you're talking about qualifications for secretary of state, that qualifies her more than reading talking points. >> and at the beginning of this she was one of the few administration officials along with hillary clinton who pushed reluctant people inside the white house, including tom donnell lynn to interview in libya, a position senator republicans took at the time. >> human rights is a key issue and done a lot at u.n. with regard to women, disabled people. and i worked with her in the clinton administration. she was, you know, very tenacious. very intelligent woman. very strong willed. i guess one of the things, as a woman i don't like, some of the criticism of her, if this was a man, it -- these would be positive attributes. >> exactly. >> as a woman, well you know she's feisty. >> or they -- when mccain said she's not very brought, this is s
foreign policy. what do all three of them have in common in they'll get tea party challenges in 2014. and you know, i read the speeches that rubio and paul ryan gave tonight and they were wonderful about the need to reex out to the poor and the afflicted. and so on. but every republican who votes for any kind of revenue increase in these coming, in these coming votes, there will be facing a tea party challenge. and i suspect that that party is going to have to come to terms with that. it may take a couple more cycles to do it. >>> have the tea party challenge would not even let these guys loose to vote for the american disabilities act going worldwide. >> outrageous. it is just, it is beyond outrageous. it is the kind of crazy nut behavior that lost in this election. mitt romney might have been a more successful candidate if he had stood up to the tea party at any one point during the election. he was never outflanked to his right during the course of winning that nomination. and i think that republicans are going to have to ask themselves. especially those who want to be president.
ridiculed hillary clinton's foreign policy experience and called john mccain reckless and confused. if the president does nominate her, those who know susan rice well say she's more than up for the fight, and although it would be a bruising confirmation battle, she almost certainly would have the votes to be confirmed. jonathan karl, abc news, washington. >>> interesting parallel that story points out between condoleezza, confirmation process, and this one. "the washington post," interesting profile, i like the human nuggets they find. as u.n. ambassador she gained a reputation for sharp intellect. and sharp elbows. she is not known for diplomatic finesse, known for being aggressive sometimes too aggressive and using salty language on occasion. in private she has a good sense of humor. trying to dig up some humanity on her as well, but clearly she's a bulldog behind closed doors. >> they wouldn't indicate whether or not they would block the nomination if it gets to the point. the president has not nominated her to this point, we just want to make that clear. but some of the beef th
, the administration chose that particular foreign policy leader to go on sunday shows as opposed to other folks in the administration. my hunch is -- this is really just my guess. it isn't something i've coordinated. >> no talking points with the intelligence? >> no talking points. my view of it is that this was obviously a terrible incident where americans were killed. and there was clear sort of lack of full coordination and communication between elements of the executive branch. and they made a choice to have her be the sort of face forward for the administration on responding to questions about what had happened and why and when and where. i would be joining calls for an investigation and a joint committee and so forth if the administration were stonewalling and saying we won't be accountable for this. we won't tell you what happened. we won't get into the background. that's not been my experience. the senate foreign relations committee on which i serve unanimously sent a letter to the administration asking that we be briefe
of the treasury, he was deputy secretary during president bush and happened to be a senior foreign policy ambassador to germany and is one of the very few people who synthesizes the economic and national security in such a holistic way. his dad was a famous democrat who was one of the reasons i moved to washington, really great to have bob here. to michael porter's right ahead douglas holtz-eakin iran the congressional budget office and is a distinguished economist. he was john mccain's economic adviser in the first campaign. he is now running the american action forum. he is one of the best hot shots on fiscal issues but does it kindly and then we have steve case. i wanted to give him chairmanship of the jobs council, jeff immelt had that but not for long. steve case, one of the founders and chairman of aol, he chairs the entrepreneurship council, chairman of revolution, very tied up in trying to think about what are the spark the drive innovation, creativity, how do you drive young people here. you have been involved in a major study, u.s. competitive project at harvard business school.
that he has on foreign policy in the republican senate caucus? mika and i talked to so many people over the past two, three years that say we want, republican senators, we want out of afghanistan but, you know what, we just sort of stay out of john's way. how many times have we heard that? >> a lot. it's disturbing. >> we hear it all the time. they stay out of his way. are they going to blindly follow and, again, i love and respect senator mccain, but i don't want my party to blindly follow him over a cliff on this battle especially if it's a personal one. >> well, on this battle it may be a personal one. i think the answer to your broader question is that republicans will continue to respect and follow his advice and syria is the next big issue that he is pounding away on. he was at a forum at the museum yesterday and crying out for american leadership on syria which means more engagement, more involvement. so there are a lot of big issues that he has huge influence on because of his experiences, his personal history. this issue i'm not so sure they'll follow him on. two of the three s
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
things. they don't believe in the same way to prosperity. they don't believe in the same way in foreign policy. they can agree that they love america. we do know, in fact, that there has been some democratic interest in one governor romney's ideas, which was to put a cap on deductions. just say, okay, you can only take, you know, this much of your income, that kind of thing. can i see that there might be a discussion about that, but the specifics are not going to be dealt with between mitt romney and president obama. that ship sailed. this has to do with the president and basically the republicans on the house side, so i see this more as a photo op. i guess we're fwog get a still picture and a read-out about their nice, cordal meeting. i'm not saying nothing could happen. i just think it's hard to figure what it would be. there's ain't lot of love between them here. they have to make nice. how do they begin, do you think, to work in the same direction, to kind of put that aside? how much of this relationship really needs repairing? >> i don't know that either one of them feel it needs r
was offering in terms of economic direction, foreign policy direction. had to reflect on the road we've just traveled in the last four years and as voters do, they spent a lot of time thinking about the future. so in the next four years who can i trust on the economy, on social issues and foreign policy. and we live in a country that is even pli divided politically and we have close elections. our victory in 2008 was a landslide. it was clear this election was going to be closer, fwiven the economy and divisions in the country. with that being said, we still won electoral college, maybe not a landslide but a clear majority. our popular vote is 3% which is a healthy margin. and i think the reason we won is people understood where we had been economically. all of you have lived through the recession. this is not something that is an academic theory. everyone painfully lived through the recession. we are beginning to recover from that. the economy has created jobs over 5 fnt 5 million jobs which our economy is far too week but the electorate said i'm beginning to feel some progress. does that m
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)